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Thread: WANTED: Aircraft Structures & Sheet Metal Technician

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Clearwater, Florida
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    Thumbs up WANTED: Aircraft Structures & Sheet Metal Technician

    WANTED: Aircraft structures & sheet metal technician for a well established WARBIRD rebuild facility in JEROME, IDAHO! Must be versed in fixturing of aircraft components, be-able to read & understand blueprints, material alloys, heat treating, forming of aluminum, chrome-moly & stainless steel. Operate english wheel, planishing hammer, shrinker/stretcher, etc. Looking for a person willing to relocate that has the experience and passion for the job!

    Serious Inquires Only.........this is not for a apprenticeship!!!!

    contact: John Lane <jlane@mindspring.com>
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  2. #2

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    Bump.....................another try!!

  3. #3
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    Wink Btt

    Guys this is a great opprotunity !
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    Operate english wheel, planishing hammer, shrinker/stretcher, etc.
    Serious Inquires Only.........this is not for a apprenticeship!!!!

    contact: John Lane <jlane@mindspring.com>
    Stating that you need exp with a wheel and a shrinker/strectcher pretty much weeds out any apprentices right there...
    yes you can have overkill....... but, can you ever have too much overkill?

  5. #5
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    Default

    duplicate entry of #4
    yes you can have overkill....... but, can you ever have too much overkill?

  6. #6
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    Wink Well, its all about the future

    I can use a shrinker, stretcher, planishing hammer, english wheel. I learned from books, videos, and practice.

    This very simple repair here

    http://www.aircraftmechanic.org/show...?t=1527&page=2

    required an english wheel to complete, due to a compound curve of the gear door.

    If your looking for a seriously interesting, long term, highly desired nitch... warbird repair would be it.
    But yes, this is as far above the average parts changer, as a doctor would be above a paramedic.

    It is truely an application of Art. And seeing warbirds flying, knowing YOU helped make it, would be a side of Aviation, that I think would be entirely enjoyable. not to mention, once you developed a reputation, an in the Warbird field, there are people who will seek you out for resto work.

    So yea, if I was 30, I might practice, go to a class, and try this job. Because it teaches things, that are no longer taught.


    and pardon my hubris, but I think work quality, general knowledge wise, ethics, I am shit hot, and this job, would challange the HELL out of me.

    But that would not stop me from trying.....


    Steve
    Steve
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  7. #7
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    Default

    I'm kickin butt in sheet metal now, wish I was further along with that that's thar is my PERFICK "landing spot
    ..:!:.. who is John Galt? ..:!:.. freind of Bill W. 5/21/1988

  8. #8
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    Wink LOL id LOVE to be your lead for one night

    Quote Originally Posted by Virginwidow View Post
    I'm kickin butt in sheet metal now, wish I was further along with that that's thar is my PERFICK "landing spot
    last guy that bragged to me, had to drill 168 holes, perfectly countersink, deburr, and help make the panels....LOL He did great, But its a challange to hear it you need any advice, just ask..


    S
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  9. #9
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    I've been reading some of yer back archives -- and already feel less "old and doddering" cause it's taken me a good 10 hours to lay out this stinkin piece :-/

    It would help if I wasn't so damn hard headed... My brain gets stuck on "THAT is NOT a blueprint, it aint even a cartoon!" slowly it dawns - the excercize is not just "Make the part properly" but like a puzzle (it's intentionally vague and oblique) in order to help us think. d0h.

    Took some scraps to be sure I've got this shear and brake tamed before I mess up. Then I measure the scraps -- !@! CRIPES!!!

    Spent a good couple hours crunching numbers by the damn book only to discover THE BOOK NUMBERS ARE OUT... the brake is not shimmed right? (?)

    (yes I mic'd the stock)

    So, the first thing I learnt is make the test bends BEFORE the layout...

    Still trying to get the hang of is how far to pull the darn brake (or how long to hold it there) to get the angle spot on. Any input?

    I dunno if I'm really any good at it, but it's purty

    Bobby in TN
    ..:!:.. who is John Galt? ..:!:.. freind of Bill W. 5/21/1988

  10. #10
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    Wink Ahhh Grasshopper.....

    Your seeing the light

    I will tell you secret, a brake is an extremely imprecise pece of equipment. A lot of the best " Production Techs " Bend the part first, ( always make sure NOT with the grain btw ) and then make it. When you set the part, and measure, and put the centerline exactly where it should be, your always off about 1/8th of an inch... They also have sleeves for the blocks, for broader bends.

    Now a true sheetie, one thats all they did for 25 years, can make a god damned soccer ball with tin snips, and 2 blocks of wood, and 2 C clamps.....LOL Kinda like the old guy at the pool hall, that takes a bar cue, turns it backwards and beats a good player using a 600 dollar cue. Its an art.
    I have been doing repairs since I started GA in 86 or so, an I slowly picked up a lot of helpful tricks. But to this day, if you handed me a blueprint to build a complex assembly, Id hand it back, and say, you need a sheetie to do this.
    That by no means my skills are not valuable, I have never had to hand an REO or an EO back. And when Scott and I worked together ( the other guy in the videos ) it was like magic. Where he was weak, I was strong, and vice versa. Best working partner I have ever had.

    Practice until you know where your bends come out right, and use a sharpie and mark the brake. but remember, the minute you do, someones gonna come and change something, so always check if its been a few hours or days.
    At some point, with enough practice, youll be able to eyeball it. But Ill say again, sheetmetal as a career, is a hard ass, hard on your body, thankless job. Most of the sheeties I know, severly limp, and most have severe arthritis, from the bucking bar vibration, and forcing your fingers to hold them in confined spaces. I feel sheeties should make 10 dollars more an hour for this exact reason. But most make less.... its not fair... But what in life is..

    steve
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

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