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  1. #1
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    Default Tubing Flare Tool

    Check out what I just got on ebay for under 20 bucks.


    LOVE these old quality Tools


    Click image for larger version. 

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    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  2. #2
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    Ok, I got it today and took it for a test drive. Amazing tool. Easy as pie, and a height stop, smooth as silk.

    Here are a few pics.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    Ok, I got it today and took it for a test drive. Amazing tool. Easy as pie, and a height stop, smooth as silk.

    Here are a few pics.

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	4195

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Holy cow is that a double flare on a stainless steel tube?

    If not what tool would you recommend that could do 37 deg flares on stainless and soft metal, I found this but the cost is high - https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brake-Line-...n9s5:rk:1:pf:0

    I am going to need some more practice flaring tubing before the A&P exam but if I buy one I dont want to have to buy one again and I do non aviation work with swagelok parts so I figure I might as well get something that will also do stainless and the 45 deg dies was a plus as well. But the cost is kind of a bummer and I will likely have to buy more dies.

  4. #4
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    Its Aluminum. Id suggest Ebay, or the Yardstore

    Very few aviation flares are rolled. This tool is the absolute last word, I got lucky as hell


    Steve


    pearso;27005]Holy cow is that a double flare on a stainless steel tube?

    If not what tool would you recommend that could do 37 deg flares on stainless and soft metal, I found this but the cost is high - https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brake-Line-...n9s5:rk:1:pf:0

    I am going to need some more practice flaring tubing before the A&P exam but if I buy one I dont want to have to buy one again and I do non aviation work with swagelok parts so I figure I might as well get something that will also do stainless and the 45 deg dies was a plus as well. But the cost is kind of a bummer and I will likely have to buy more dies.[/QUOTE]
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  5. #5
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    I believe the break lines are stainless and any tubing forward of the firewall. I would like to install a smoke system in my pitts some day and that will very likely require double flare with stainless steel lines, at the least for the run from the fire wall to the tie-in at the exhaust. The nozzle right at the exhaust will have to be welded in.

    I seen snap-on has a nice set but it appears its only 45 deg - https://store.snapon.com/Flaring-Too...--P644043.aspx

    I sent out an email hoping that they have 37 deg dies as well. I read some reviews of the other tool I posted and it is made in China .....

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    Its Aluminum. Id suggest Ebay, or the Yardstore

    Very few aviation flares are rolled. This tool is the absolute last word, I got lucky as hell


    Steve


    pearso;27005]Holy cow is that a double flare on a stainless steel tube?

    If not what tool would you recommend that could do 37 deg flares on stainless and soft metal, I found this but the cost is high - https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brake-Line-...n9s5:rk:1:pf:0

    I am going to need some more practice flaring tubing before the A&P exam but if I buy one I dont want to have to buy one again and I do non aviation work with swagelok parts so I figure I might as well get something that will also do stainless and the 45 deg dies was a plus as well. But the cost is kind of a bummer and I will likely have to buy more dies.
    [/QUOTE]

  6. #6
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    Try ATS or the Yardstore



    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    I believe the break lines are stainless and any tubing forward of the firewall. I would like to install a smoke system in my pitts some day and that will very likely require double flare with stainless steel lines, at the least for the run from the fire wall to the tie-in at the exhaust. The nozzle right at the exhaust will have to be welded in.

    I seen snap-on has a nice set but it appears its only 45 deg - https://store.snapon.com/Flaring-Too...--P644043.aspx

    I sent out an email hoping that they have 37 deg dies as well. I read some reviews of the other tool I posted and it is made in China .....
    [/QUOTE]
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  7. #7
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    So I think in the rare cases where I have to work with stainless steel in my plane I will just use flareless fittings such as swagelok which means I am back to soft metal flaring only. I already use swagelok to connect my air speed indicator and static ports so that I can detach my wings to trailer my plane as swagelok have disconnects. Where did you get that tool and what is it called?

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    Try ATS or the Yardstore


    [/QUOTE]

  8. #8
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    Many planes use plastic/nylon lines for Pitot Static systems. Another possible would be aluminum and AN Fittings. Stainless may be hard, but compared to the others, it is brittle. We use hydraulic stainless lines but only where there is no chance of a flex.

    Ill look at the name on the tool when I get to the hangar. I love vintage tools. Another killer deal I got was a Cherry Max set, complete from 1944 see pictures.


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    ]
    Quote Originally Posted by rppearso View Post
    So I think in the rare cases where I have to work with stainless steel in my plane I will just use flareless fittings such as swagelok which means I am back to soft metal flaring only. I already use swagelok to connect my air speed indicator and static ports so that I can detach my wings to trailer my plane as swagelok have disconnects. Where did you get that tool and what is it called?
    [/QUOTE]
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  9. #9
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    And this one shops every tool it came with including a bad ass cherry gauge as well as the go no go gauges


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    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    Many planes use plastic/nylon lines for Pitot Static systems. Another possible would be aluminum and AN Fittings. Stainless may be hard, but compared to the others, it is brittle. We use hydraulic stainless lines but only where there is no chance of a flex.

    Ill look at the name on the tool when I get to the hangar. I love vintage tools. Another killer deal I got was a Cherry Max set, complete from 1944 see pictures.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    ]
    [/QUOTE]

    The stainless fitting is fit onto an aluminum tube going to the pitot and the other end of the fitting is a plastic hose going to the instrument so its completely flexible. I looked at some of the other fitting options but swagelok was sleek and simple can did not introduce a bunch of bulk. They use 316 stainless which is nice, I have never had issues with 316 stainless steel.