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  1. #11
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    May 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdsalern View Post
    My Snap On metric 3/8" set has several sockets that are flaking around the tips. It's an older set and seen a bit of use.
    Wow that's weird I've got some 30 year old Snap On sockets that were used with hand tools only maybe you used power tools with those sockets...

  2. #12
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    Dec 2015
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    Warrantied those sockets today and thought about this post. The driver asked me if I had anything that needed to be swapped, no questions asked. As to power tools, I didn't use any on the sockets. Name:  20180810_232500.jpg
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  3. #13
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    Did they get dropped to the pavement?

  4. #14
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    Pavement is likely. I didn't notice until someone else did. These are from working on autos and before I took better care of my things. I was amazed I was asked if I had anything to warranty and how easy it was to do after so many horror stories.

  5. #15
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    Refer to Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert Pirsig or Illusions by Richard Bach :-) Don't go cheap on tools you'll use frequently - the junk will bring you frustration - the quality tools will feel good in your hands and bring you joy every time you use them. Your list comprises a nice set of tools that will give you a good start as you enter the workforce. Do not skimp on screwdrivers or bits - you'll be glad you didn't - or the 1/4" and 3/8" socket set (you'll use the 1/4" stuff the most - get various extension lengths). Your school doesn't list 6-point 1/4" sockets; however, you'll need those when you get to a stubborn bolt or nut - you can probably get by with a shallow set of 6-point. You'll use the wrenches a lot too so don't skimp there - you can do a lot of damage with poor quality tools - not to mention injury to yourself or others. Ok - for some wrenches and other things - especially those you intend to modify (grind down or bend)for a special purpose - you may want to go for a used or lesser quality tool. Also Snap-On wrenches do not always fit aircraft tubing B-nuts very well - sometimes they're too close tolerance and fit the nut too tight - Craftsman or Mac work better there. Some other things - picks, mirrors, magnets, files, some of the hammers, etc., you can get by with stuff from Harbor Freight or elsewhere - plus always be on the lookout for good quality gadgets. Don't discount Craigslist or eBay - you'll find some good things on there - as well as estate sales and swap meets (flea markets) - often you'll see aircraft tools for cheap because people don't know what they are. Invest in good pliers too - a good pair of duckbills and dikes (I prefer Snap-On) and Channel Locks. Various smaller and mid-size vise-grips (appropriately used) will come in handy from time-to-time. I have been an A&P for 43 years - I still have and use many of the tools I bought when I went to Embry-Riddle's A&P school from where I graduated in 1975. Most every tool of mine has a story behind it ;-) Good luck and keep 'em flying!
    Last edited by aviatortom; 08-20-2018 at 11:12 PM. Reason: Typo

  6. #16
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    Tossing in my two cents with regards to tools...

    A majority of my hand tools were hand-me-down Craftsman tools from my grandfather who was a mechanic all his life (cars, trucks, etc). I used them proudly, because they not only had practicality value, but sentimental value. If I had to start over though, and didn't have the opportunity for hand-me-downs, SnapOn would be my first choice. Craftsman tools treated me well, but it seems the quality and ease of exchanging broken tools has diminished. When buying tools, you really need to consider the ease of replacement (under lifetime warranty) when a tool needs to be replaced, and the tool quality so you hopefully never have to replace it in the first place!!!

  7. #17
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    Glenn: After dropping one today on the rough concrete, I believe you are right. Good call.

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