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Thread: Greetings!

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    Default Greetings!

    Hello Everyone,

    I am still new at the aircraft trade, with nearly 2 years experience. I have not yet qualified, and I have realized that this trade is not for the faint of heart, weak of body, spirit or mind. It's clear that the trade can be very demanding in all aspects of life.

    I still have alot to learn, and it would be great to get some advice on how to become more skilful. Going to a college or A&P school really didn't teach me anything except the very basics, and did not prepare me for the experience of actually working on a flying machine. It can be both exhilirating and absolutely terrifying, and I cannot imagine myself doing anything else.

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    Gaining skill is largely based on your personal drive. It also needs to be valuable to you for no other reason. This is because mechanics are not in control of their employment and skill is very difficult for an employer to determine and therefore difficult for a mechanic to sell. Good work often goes unrecognized and unrewarded in this business. That is why you see very few old guys on the hangar floor anymore.

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    My hangar is full of old guys, I think the average is around 50 now... Welcome Mr. Lodestar, volunteer for everything to gain experience.
    "Arguing with an inspector is like wrestling with a pig in the mud, after a while you realize the pig enjoys it".

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    Find the most knowledgeable techs you can find that are willing to share their experience. Follow them like a whipped dog, ask questions, ask them to let you do the task. Show up early, stay till it's finished. If where you are working does not pay lots of $$$ keep moving until you are employed somewhere that has the best benefits in the industry.
    Health, retirement, pay.

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    Good question. I agree a lot with the responses so far.
    It takes drive and determination to learn, most shops skilled people do not teach, because they think it takes their edge away. Some people will teach meaningful lessons, some people will try to teach you how to hold a screwdriver.

    So basically it is up to you to learn all you can.
    I started in the USAF and learned little except Jet Engines, then I went to a 145 Shop and was incredibly lucky to have people teach me, because I was a loud mouth irritating person ( lol ) And yet they did, and I learned all kinds of skills.
    Since then aside from personal pride, it has helped very little in my career progression. I am not sorry I learned a thing, however I think the least taught skills are people skills, and people skills will propel you much further than any amount of talent or skillsets. A good positive attitude, a good work ethic, and a degree of being humble. These traits will take you far, people skills are paramount.


    Steve


    Quote Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    I am still new at the aircraft trade, with nearly 2 years experience. I have not yet qualified, and I have realized that this trade is not for the faint of heart, weak of body, spirit or mind. It's clear that the trade can be very demanding in all aspects of life.

    I still have alot to learn, and it would be great to get some advice on how to become more skilful. Going to a college or A&P school really didn't teach me anything except the very basics, and did not prepare me for the experience of actually working on a flying machine. It can be both exhilirating and absolutely terrifying, and I cannot imagine myself doing anything else.
    Last edited by Steve340; 11-28-2017 at 11:07 AM.
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

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    Good work ethic will really take you places in this industry. I'm around 7.5 years now in the industry and the doors really start to open up around 5.

    It's a very demanding job and if you want to be successful at it, it'll take a toll on you. What kinda shop are you in?
    Last edited by brettboat; 11-28-2017 at 01:02 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brettboat View Post
    Good work ethic will really take you places in this industry. I'm around 7.5 years now in the industry and the doors really start to open up around 5.

    It's a very demanding job and if you want to be successful at it, it'll take a toll on you. What kinda shop are you in?
    That very true if you work in a non Union shop or for any worker trying to feel important for whatever reason. "Work ethic" is perception not reality. It's a way of saying "I like/respect someone/myself because they try/care at work. This is most important amongst workers because that is all they have to sell and can't profit form the outcome of their labor. I have been looking around jsfirm lately, I've noticed everyone casually wanting a decade of experience yet offering half top airline wages. Where is all this experienced help coming from?

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    Man, has it been that long?
    We raised ya on this site !!!


    Steve

    Quote Originally Posted by brettboat View Post
    Good work ethic will really take you places in this industry. I'm around 7.5 years now in the industry and the doors really start to open up around 5.

    It's a very demanding job and if you want to be successful at it, it'll take a toll on you. What kinda shop are you in?
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

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    Quote Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
    That very true if you work in a non Union shop or for any worker trying to feel important for whatever reason. "Work ethic" is perception not reality. It's a way of saying "I like/respect someone/myself because they try/care at work. This is most important amongst workers because that is all they have to sell and can't profit form the outcome of their labor. I have been looking around jsfirm lately, I've noticed everyone casually wanting a decade of experience yet offering half top airline wages. Where is all this experienced help coming from?
    Are those contract positions or direct? $35/hr with per diem is pretty good money.

    I'm non union so my pay raises are not based on years in service but performance, profitability, etc, etc. I'm paid very well. Happier than a pig in shit. I couldn't/wouldn't take an airline job.

    and yea Steve, over 5 years on this site alone plus the time I spent at my first aero job when I was super green... Getting old now

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    I suppose $35 contract isn't too bad. I know that 20yrs ago it was $26 and only $4 was taxed. Contract work needs to be over $40 in order to keep up historically and with current airline trends. I would love to get back into the game but can't afford the pay cut.
    Last edited by kevbo; 11-28-2017 at 02:05 PM.

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