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  1. #1
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    Default Is my school lying to me or not?

    Hello Everyone,

    I am currently enrolled at PIA (Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronatuics). It's a 16month program to get licensed by the FAA and learn simple Powerplant & Airframe concepts.

    So a big part of the school is thei 98% placement. I see everyone on forums , YouTube, and everywhere else making comments on how horrible this industry really is at the pay for the work/stress load we have on us to maintain an airplane that holds 100's of lives.

    They have stastistics that support the industry's need for more A&P Mechanics currently and more so in the future. Do you guys just like to rant that much or are all your complaints pretty straight forward and real?

    Do you guys see a growth in this industry, is it possible from a family guy to spend time with his family while making a good living wage or moving up in his career?

    Also, where do you see most people starting out as "beginners"? Corporate, Regional, Major, small time? Hangar, outdoor, traveling?

    Finally, is AeroStandard a decent company to try and work for? I am wanting to live in Aiken, SC for my FiancÚ and Augustua, GA Regional is the closest, but it's still only an hour drive from Columbia, SC. 2hr from Atlanta.

    Thanks for anything you guys could answer for me.

    P.S. I will submitt some of the documents they gave me when signing up for schooling so you can get a better understanding of what FAA Schools are putting out there at the current.

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    I also have always wanted to WELD, could i have my FAA License & Welding Certifications and find a better job than most people? Or would Avionics be a better choice? Or an all rounded technician?

    I hear that many hangars/companies hire out Certified Welders to do their work instead of having an in shop guy just getting the work done.

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    This is probably the most common question we have here.

    Bottom line is if you love airplanes, that's gonna outweigh the negatives. And don't get me wrong, every field has its downsides. We have a few guys who regularly log on here seemingly to prevent new people from becoming A&P mechanics. It's a free world and I try not to censor what's written. in MY opinion, its a good field. and yes it has its downsides such as low beginning pay, shifts and working holidays, working outside at a lot of companies, If I was new, I would concentrate on FedX and or UPS as an employer, second the Majors, third Regionals. These give the most security and benefits. 145's are cool, but extremely competitive and pay isn't there. If your a great communicator, and carry a good attitude, and are bright, you can absolutely advance.

    Never heard of that company, but if its an MRO I'd steer clear, they want slaves with A&P tickets and many treat you accordingly.

    Steve

    QUOTE=Chrisyeager12;26399]Hello Everyone,

    I am currently enrolled at PIA (Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronatuics). It's a 16month program to get licensed by the FAA and learn simple Powerplant & Airframe concepts.

    So a big part of the school is thei 98% placement. I see everyone on forums , YouTube, and everywhere else making comments on how horrible this industry really is at the pay for the work/stress load we have on us to maintain an airplane that holds 100's of lives.

    They have stastistics that support the industry's need for more A&P Mechanics currently and more so in the future. Do you guys just like to rant that much or are all your complaints pretty straight forward and real?

    Do you guys see a growth in this industry, is it possible from a family guy to spend time with his family while making a good living wage or moving up in his career?

    Also, where do you see most people starting out as "beginners"? Corporate, Regional, Major, small time? Hangar, outdoor, traveling?

    Finally, is AeroStandard a decent company to try and work for? I am wanting to live in Aiken, SC for my FiancÚ and Augustua, GA Regional is the closest, but it's still only an hour drive from Columbia, SC. 2hr from Atlanta.

    Thanks for anything you guys could answer for me.

    P.S. I will submitt some of the documents they gave me when signing up for schooling so you can get a better understanding of what FAA Schools are putting out there at the current.[/QUOTE]
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisyeager12 View Post
    I also have always wanted to WELD, could i have my FAA License & Welding Certifications and find a better job than most people? Or would Avionics be a better choice? Or an all rounded technician?

    I hear that many hangars/companies hire out Certified Welders to do their work instead of having an in shop guy just getting the work done.
    The school probably didn't outright lie to you but they certainly painted an unrealistic picture. PIA is good but expensive, if you just started think about moving to a community college to save a lot of money. All employers like to pigeon hole workers, no need for anyone to know how to do everything. You can pick up additional education as needed or desired. Right now, entry level jobs are easy to come by and pay is rising, which unfortunately isn't saying much. You may even get picked up by a major right away but it will take 10+yrs before you will make top money and 20+yrs of seniority to get a good schedule/location. That is the way it has always been, Im sure your school didn't mention that! As far as family life, you schedule will be opposite the rest of the world for a long time. Mon-Fri day shift operations are few and seldom pay the most.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kevbo View Post
    The school probably didn't outright lie to you but they certainly painted an unrealistic picture. PIA is good but expensive, if you just started think about moving to a community college to save a lot of money. All employers like to pigeon hole workers, no need for anyone to know how to do everything. You can pick up additional education as needed or desired. Right now, entry level jobs are easy to come by and pay is rising, which unfortunately isn't saying much. You may even get picked up by a major right away but it will take 10+yrs before you will make top money and 20+yrs of seniority to get a good schedule/location. That is the way it has always been, Im sure your school didn't mention that! As far as family life, you schedule will be opposite the rest of the world for a long time. Mon-Fri day shift operations are few and seldom pay the most.
    I already figured I would be working 3rd shift ; my father and brother both do for GE; granted they make the train engines and not the turbo jet engines in Dayton. It would be awesome to get in with them doing traveling warranty work.

    Thanks both of you for the heads up! I already have a no skills job that pays $16/hr

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisyeager12 View Post
    I already figured I would be working 3rd shift ; my father and brother both do for GE; granted they make the train engines and not the turbo jet engines in Dayton. It would be awesome to get in with them doing traveling warranty work.

    Thanks both of you for the heads up! I already have a no skills job that pays $16/hr
    Third shift is usually slightly more senior than first at every place I have ever worked. Second shift is always junior at any place that works round the clock. I know guys that assemble GE locomotives in Fort Worth, I have been told that the turbine plant gives no extra money for A&Ps though.

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    It looks like I'm going to make a go at the career! I'm already 4 weeks in, I feel optimistic and I would rather do airplanes than cars!

    So what specialty tools do you guys use on a more daily/weekly routine? At my technical school they do not require or even add a note to buy items such as: Safety Wire Pliers ; on the other side I have senior students telling me I would be nuts not to buy them as I would spend a whole day trying to safety wire just my part of a 747 engine we have sitting in the hangar if I do not have them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisyeager12 View Post
    It looks like I'm going to make a go at the career! I'm already 4 weeks in, I feel optimistic and I would rather do airplanes than cars!

    So what specialty tools do you guys use on a more daily/weekly routine? At my technical school they do not require or even add a note to buy items such as: Safety Wire Pliers ; on the other side I have senior students telling me I would be nuts not to buy them as I would spend a whole day trying to safety wire just my part of a 747 engine we have sitting in the hangar if I do not have them.
    Get small tools first. You will get much use from good 1/4" 12 point sockets, short wrenches, and a ratcheting screw driver(I like the T handle). Of course safety wire pliers and a ford wrench. A small awl for nut plates and a pin punch set along with common drills. These are every day tools, I had an extra box full of big stuff that I never used. There is a good chance you can at least end up in a decent paying job as long as the economy holds. If college is an option make sure to get it because working outside get tough when you get older.

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    1/4 Inch snap on swivel set, and a good set of 1/4 inch extensions.

    Safety wire pliers as well.

    Snap on should have a huge discount through your school as well.

    Snap on is the best, and there is a differenc4e.

    Craftsman, MaC and Matco are all Chinese, as is bluepoint.

    Steve
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    I have a couple gripes with snapon, mainly that they limit tool discounts for students to certain tools. Most Matco toolboxes are built in U.S. with U.S. steel and all of their boxes are eligible for student discount (and it's around 60% with them). I bought a reversible ratchet wrench set from mac that was the same cost as a blue point set (made it taiwan, only "snapon" ratchet wrenches discounted for students) but went from 1/4 to 15/16ths where bluepoint set was 5/16 to 7/8ths. Very precise set, and has a lock ring that keeps the wrench on nuts as you back them off studs. And macs mr4c ratchet is sweet.

    But snapon has great sockets and ratchets, and their discounts on those items are great. Their student program is more user friendly than other companies. Mac I had to fax in a handwritten list of tools I wanted with my card info and total after discount. Get with the 21st century mac!

    Long story short, different brands have pros and cons.