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  1. #1
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    Default A question about becoming an avionics technician

    Hey everyone,
    I have a question about becoming an avionics technician. Do I need to go through the A&P training, get the license from FAA and then get into avionics ? Or I can get the proper training in avionics and get a certificate or license and start working in this field ?
    I really appreciate your advice and opinions

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vick120 View Post
    Hey everyone,
    I have a question about becoming an avionics technician. Do I need to go through the A&P training, get the license from FAA and then get into avionics ? Or I can get the proper training in avionics and get a certificate or license and start working in this field ?
    I really appreciate your advice and opinions
    Avionics is a small part of maintenance, usually about 5% of the workforce. Line maintenance will do a lot of avionics work along with everything else. You will have a lot more opportunities if you start as a mechanic and move into electrical work.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for your response, honestly Iím 32 years old and just got tired of my job in a convenient store for 5 years. I donít have any other career and have been here in the states for 6 years now. So Iím trying to get some kind of fast paced training just to start a job.
    I found a training school here in Orlando florida that offers a seven months training, twice a week, for a decent amount of money. They said they are designated to do the FCC exams and give me a license issued from the FCC.
    The question is, do you think with possession of such a license I can get a job in this field and consider that I have a career ? Letís say I found a job, you think I can gain enough experience in mechanics while working in avionics to enable me for A&P license ?
    Sorry for making it long but Iím desperate to talking to someone experienced and get information before making my decision.
    Thanks again for your time.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vick120 View Post
    Thanks for your response, honestly I’m 32 years old and just got tired of my job in a convenient store for 5 years. I don’t have any other career and have been here in the states for 6 years now. So I’m trying to get some kind of fast paced training just to start a job.
    I found a training school here in Orlando florida that offers a seven months training, twice a week, for a decent amount of money. They said they are designated to do the FCC exams and give me a license issued from the FCC.
    The question is, do you think with possession of such a license I can get a job in this field and consider that I have a career ? Let’s say I found a job, you think I can gain enough experience in mechanics while working in avionics to enable me for A&P license ?
    Sorry for making it long but I’m desperate to talking to someone experienced and get information before making my decision.
    Thanks again for your time.
    An A&P is 10x more marketable than a FCC license. You are not required to log any time for experience, some people work under many mechanics so a log helps convince the final one to write a letter of recommendation. At the same time some FSDOs want to see some kind of experience documentation, it just depends on who you walk up to. Schools however ARE required to log students time and performance. Experience signoffs come from relatives or friends helping someone out of attending school. If you are an immigrant, some shops are ethnically oriented so you may be able to get into the industry that way.
    Last edited by kevbo; 02-08-2018 at 08:58 PM.

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    Get your A&P. Most of us get the A&P and then learn the electrical and avionics part on the job. I can troubleshoot TCAS SQKs way better than some kid outta school.

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    If you really want your GROL FCC license I'd buy a book and find the local HAM club, many offer free or cheap study groups and test prep. You can also take the exam with them.

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    One thing to consider. There are two types of Avionics people.
    The FCC Type, and the bench check electrical genius type. Embry Riddle has the latter and they are highly trained extremely well paid technicians.
    What they are offering you in Orlando seems like the bare minimum to get a job Many airlines use Avionics A&P's which are people with above average electrical knowledge, basically swap boxes and sometimes help with more advanced electrical troubleshooting. MOST A&P's are NOT good wiring electrical schematic people.


    Steve

    Quote Originally Posted by Vick120 View Post
    Hey everyone,
    I have a question about becoming an avionics technician. Do I need to go through the A&P training, get the license from FAA and then get into avionics ? Or I can get the proper training in avionics and get a certificate or license and start working in this field ?
    I really appreciate your advice and opinions
    You never have a second chance, to make a first impression

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    Having talked with a half dozen companies recently, there is a very large demand for avionics experience/training. Partly due to ads b, partly because thats just the way of the future (i.e. 777s). Our professors are trying to set up an evening 20 week avionics crash course, just to get us more knowledge in that realm of aviation maintenance. Plus is doesnt hurt to have "avionics something" on the resume.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve340 View Post
    One thing to consider. There are two types of Avionics people.
    The FCC Type, and the bench check electrical genius type. Embry Riddle has the latter and they are highly trained extremely well paid technicians. Steve
    I would offer a third type, and that is an avionics installer.

    FCC legally does noting for you within our world. A repairmen (under a 14 CFR 145 repair station) is what is required to sign off the repair to the radio, and in some cases the installation into the aircraft. What an FCC was used for was a go/no-go gauge for union members trying to get in to the back shop on those cold winter nights or hot summer days.

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    Steve (and others):
    Curious about your take on AAR as a place to work. Yea, it's an MRO and I get the feeling a lot of folks here don't like them. But what's your take on AAR? They're advertising for some A&Ps in an area that interests me (Chicago).

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